• Tread softly on the Earth and leave only footprints on your path

OUR DO’S AND DON’TS OF GREEN TRAVEL

  • DO take an aluminium water bottle with which you can top up with local drinking water wherever you travel in southern Africa. There are few places where the water is undrink able and the saving on plastic waste is huge. Bottles with replacable filters are also available if you are worried about water quality. Our journey clients will receive one free of charge with our compliments and in aid of Saving the Rhino.
  • DON’T visit any park or so called sanctuary where breeding and/or petting of wild animals especially lion cubs is allowed. These establishments are a front for the canned lion hunting industry and also linked to the lion bone trade in Asia. By petting or volunteering to help raise these cute cubs you are signing their death warrant. Instead help Africa’s lions by voicing your disapproval to any tour operators or establishments that promote cub petting/breeding and ask us for ways where you can support projects and people who are making a difference.
  • DO try to incorporate a visit either to a local community or a project whilst on your journey to Africa and put a small percentage of your planned budget aside to make your own contribution in a meaningful way.
  • DON’T support wildlife reserves where trophy hunting is allowed. You will be surprised how many of South Africa’s well known private concession reserves continue this practise undercover in the name of so called con-servation. Trophy hunting concentrates on the largest strongest animals, depletes the genetic pool, has huge impacts on the eco system and takes no consideration of wisdom transfer between alpha leaders and their families.
  • DO save on electricity and water wherever you stay. Remember that water is Africa’s most precious asset and each drop saved helps. Green friendly devices such as solar chargers for your mobile phone, camera batteries and torch can easily be purchased in advance.
  • DON’T buy more plastic. Pack a recyclable shopping bag with you or light daypack so that you have something to carry your shopping or supplies around with you. In many food stores in Africa plastic bags are still the only receptacle available.
  • DO support local wherever you can. Rather choose to stay in privately owned eco-friendly properties than internationally branded large resorts and hotels. Eat out in local restaurants and choose local instead of imported beverages. Normal tap water is drinkable throughout  most of southern Africa so ask for a glass or jug of tap water with lemon and ice instead of a plastic bottle.
  • DO support local communities by buying art and crafts directly from them instead of via an international airport or upmarket shopping center where very little income filters back to the original source
  • DO be respectful of both people and animals you wish to photograph. Ask permission from local people before taking photos and allow animals space to breathe and freedom of movement. Voice your concerns if your guide is obstructing the natural path of an animal you are viewing. Living in the moment and the experience is worth more than striving for that perfect shot.
  • DO travel with a humble respectful attitude willing to observe and learn as much as possible about the culture and nature you are impacting by your interaction.